Agenda: museums and exhibitions, art, food and drinks, nature and parks and nightlife in Ostend

New at Mu.ZEE: The Raoul Servais Wing

Where:
Mu.ZEE
When:
30/06/18 to 30/06/21

Raoul Servais (born 1 May 1928, Ostend) is a renowned animation filmmaker. In the early 1950s he studied applied arts at the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Ghent (KASK). Servais painted and drew, and was very active in graphics too, but from the beginning his heart was always in animation films. The artist had neither experience nor financial means, but his curiosity and drive were enormous. In 1960 he was able to start work as a teacher at KASK, where he developed the first animated film course in Europe. In total, he made sixteen animated films. Between Havenlicht (Harbour Light, 1960) and Tank (2015) there is a gigantic evolution in style and technique. With each new film production, you feel his curiosity for new and hitherto unknown ways of creating imagery and atmosphere. Raoul Servais has won many international film prizes, such as the Palme d’Or in Cannes (Operation X-70, 1971 & Harpya, 1979) and the Primo Premio in Venice (Chromophobia, 1966). Servais’s love of animation is a shared love. As of summer 2018, it can be enjoyed on a permanent basis in the Raoul Servais Wing of Mu.ZEE. A large selection of original documents, (cellophane) drawings and films will have a permanent place there. This wing of the museum is not intended to be the end destination for the rich oeuvre of this star of the film industry, but a new start, an inspiring place for young filmmakers.

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Museum Amandine

April 3rd 1995. On this day the Amandine entered Oostende harbour for the last time. On this day it dropped anchor for the very last time. The crew disembarked, swallowed hard and went home without looking back. The last page in Oostende's book on Iceland Fishing had been turned. Now, 13 years later, the Amandine has started her second career, a career as an interactive museum. It has taken two years of hard and concentrated work in the old shipyard 'Seghers' to restore the...

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Japanese Garden

Take a stroll in this magnificent 'Kaiyusschiki-style' garden and marvel at the various landscapes which unfold before your eyes. No-one would expect this oasis of tranquillity and contemplation so near to the sea and Oostende’s vibrant city centre. During Belgian school holidays (with the exception of the Christmas and the spring break holidays), open every day.

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Maria Hendrikapark

The Maria Hendrikapark is an area of about 45 ha situated south of the city centre. The park has a variety of different ponds, open grass areas, two playgrounds and the Koninginnehof with cafetaria and restaurant, rowing boats, pedal boats, a traffic park, baby-carts and a miniature golf course. It is also a paradise for joggers. The park is also called 'Het Bosje'.

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Floral Clock

Floral Clock. A special creation in which a total number of about 20 000 plants are used to form a unique palette of colour. The date - made of flowers - is adjusted every day during the summer months.

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Leopold Park

Leopold Park was laid out in 1860 on the old town fortifications. The beautiful bandstand was inaugurated in 1885. The world-famous floral clock was placed there in 1963, where it still stands now.

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The Vicognebos – Ostend

A little over 10 ha, Ostend’s Vicogne wood consists of young woodland and polder meadows, while the Vicognezwin retention pond, an old antitank trench and the Spuikom basin provide the area with much-needed water. A winding walk will give you a glimpse of the open polder grasslands while taking you through the woodland populated by a wide variety of small songbirds in spring. Bird lovers are definitely in for a treat along the Schietbaanstraat as the islands in the adjacent Spuikom welcome...

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The Geuzenbos – Ostend

Once upon a time in the 17th century the woodland here was a castle domain. Now, only some tree trunks indicate where the building once stood. A wood with some history then, making it perfect for a walk!

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Venetian Galleries

In 1900, Belgian King Leopold II commissioned architect Henri Maquet to design the first royal gallery: an L-shaped, closed and covered walkway between the royal villa and a large octagonal salon. Nowadays it is known by the name ‘Venetian Galleries’, referring to Venice’s classicist architecture. When the Belgian royal family decided they would no longer use their coastal residence, Ostend was given the concession of the entire complex and resolved that the building be used for cultural...

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The Spilliaert House

The Spilliaert House wants to introduce as many people as possible to the paintings of Léon Spilliaert. Targeting a broad audience, the centre wants to help improve access to and knowledge of the artist’s life and work. As a monographical arts centre, the Spilliaert House’s ambition is to host a new exhibition twice a year and position itself as the premier documentation centre for scientific research. Next exhibition is expected in Spring 2020.

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